Other Stuff

17
Jul
2009

The River

River3 A few weeks ago I was out taking pictures around the Rama VIII bridge here in Bangkok. I was on the Pin Klao side, having walked from the Rama VIII bridge to the Phra Pin Klao pier. I decided to sit by the river for a while and watch what was happening on that early Sunday morning.

There was plenty of activity. Folks making merit by releasing fish bought from the local markets into the river (a kind of last minute Buddhist reprieve). A few people actually bathing in the river and getting ready for the day.

And then this young women arrived carrying something bundled up in a towel – held like a doll, or small child closely against her chest. I couldn’t see what she was carrying – but I could see she was headed for the water. I asked her if she would mind if I took a few pictures.

It was then I saw that she was holding a guinea pig wrapped in a white towel.

I’ve tried to tell this story a couple of times now. Every time I do at least one of us ends up laughing – or trying to keep a straight face while I describe how I watched a young women bathe her guinea pig in the Chao Phraya River

.

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12
Jun
2009

Nikon ViewNX – You Suck

Some applications deserve ‘outing’ and Nikon ViewNX is one of them. I’ve used at least a dozen image editors, viewers, managers over the years – and the one that potentially means the most to me – sucks big time.

Not long ago I bought some of Nikon’s top gear. I love their lenses, and the new FX bodies are out of this world – but Nikon – you need to get your software in order.

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12
Jun
2009

ECCO Shoes

ecco

Probably another post that’s more tweet worthy than a blog post – but… I just can’t help it. I love ECCO shoes. I mean I really love them. I probably shouldn’t. The pair I bought today is made from Yak leather and manufactured in Thailand. Questionable characteristics on both counts. But they just feel so gooooood. I don’t mean just a little bit comfortable either – I mean they make me feel like walking that’s how darn good they are. I’ve bought ECCO shoes now for the last decade – casual, outdoor and work varieties. And each pair I’ve purchased has lasted between four and five years. The soles have never worn out and they’ve always felt better then the other brands I try when the time comes. I don’t know how you guys do it – but thank you ECCO.

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31
May
2009

HDR – First Attempt

Well with a bit more time on my hands now, I was finally able to begin experimenting with high dynamic range images (HDR). I decided to give Photomatix a try - and this is my first attempt. A picture I took on a recent trip to Vientiane. It's a merged image from four separate photographs - each at a different exposure - hence the 'dynamic range'. AGB_8132_3_4_5_s

Will be having lots of fun with this over the next week or so. :-)

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10
May
2009

RFIDs on the Brain

Speechless really. I’m not often lost for words – but this presentation by Patrick Dixon of Siemens leaves me speechless.

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14
Apr
2009

A Day of Contrasts

April 13th 2009 will be remembered by me as one of the strangest days yet here in Thailand. I think the pictures pretty much tell the story; pictures of the last moments of a running skirmish between Red-shirt protesters and the Thai Army – while at the same time over on Silom Road - Thais were celebrating Songkran with characteristic enthusiasm.

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Category: 

fromm

I figured it was about time I blogged about this book (following on from Hans Rosling’s superb TED lecture - below).

A few years ago a friend recommend a book by Erich Fromm called ‘The Heart of Man’. I had trouble finding the title at the time, however in the process discovered what I believe is considered to be one of Fromm’s most famous works - ‘The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness’ – published nine years after ‘The Heart of Man’,  and incorporating many of his earlier published ideas concerning human behaviour and culture.

The book is written in an uncomplicated, highly educational and engaging narrative that just about anyone can read. Fromm’s analysis of the instinctivism of Konrad Lorenz, to the behaviourist B.F. Skinner was eye opening.

For me the most valuable lesson in the book was his description of the primary drivers in human nature; co-operation and conflict avoidance, the desire to achieve and the desire to share. As some of the reviewers on Amazon and elsewhere have also said – this is probably the most important book I’ve ever read.

Read it – and you’ll see why.

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Category: 
15
Mar
2009

Hans Rosling and Culture

“Culture – Culture is the most important thing I would say because that is what brings joy to life. That’s the value of living…”

Hans Rosling: New insights on poverty and life around the world

The finalé is worth the price of admission alone…

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10
Mar
2009

Luang Prabang Revisited

Novice Monk Jumping into the River

Well at least I can’t be accused of lazy journalism. I went back to Luang Prabang on the 5th of March – and took with me many of the pictures I’d taken there on my previous trip. I was able to find most of the people in the pictures and give them prints – including the kids at the school, most of the apprentice monks and other people that I’d photographed there.

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23
Feb
2009

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